Basics of Hadoop User Management

Hadoop is old, everyone has their own Hadoop cluster and everyone knows how to use it. It’s 2018, right? This article is just a collection of a few gotchas, dos and don’ts with respect to User Management that shouldn’t happen in 2018 anymore.

Terminology

Just a few terms and definitions so that everyone is on the same page for the rest of the article. Roll your eyes and skip that section if you are an advanced user.

  • OS user = user that is provisioned on the operating system level of the nodes of a Hadoop cluster. You can check if the user exists on OS level by doing

id <username>

  • KDC = Key Distribution Center. This might be a standalone KDC implementation, such as the MIT KDC or an integrated one behind a Microsoft Active Directory.
  • Keytab = file that stores the encrypted password of a user provisioned in a KDC. Can be used to authenticate without the need of typing the password using the “kinit” command line tool.

Do

  • Make sure your users are available on all nodes of the OS, as well as in the KDC. This is important for several reasons:
    • When you run a job, the job might create staging/temporary directories in the /tmp/ directory, which are owned by the user running the job. The name of the directory is the name of the OS user, while the ownership belongs to authenticated user. In a secure cluster the authenticated user is the user you obtained a Kerberos ticket for from the KDC.
    • Keytabs on OS level should be only readable by the user OS user who is supposed to authenticate with them for security purposes.
    • When impersonation is turned on for services, e.g., Oozie using the -doas tag, Hive using the property hive.server2.enable.doAs=True property or Storm using the supervisor.run.worker.as.user=true  property, a user authenticated as a principal will run on the OS level as a processs owned by that user. If that user is not known to the OS, the job will fail (to start).

Don’t

  • Don’t use the hdfs user to run jobs on YARN (it’s forbidden by default and don’t change that configuration). Your problem can be solved in a different way! Only use the hdfs user for administrative tasks on the command line.
  • Don’t run Hive jobs as the “hive” user. The “hive” user is the administrative user and if at all should only be used by the Hadoop/database administrator.
  • Or in general: Don’t use the <service name> user to do  <operation> on <service name>. You saw that coming, hm?

How to Achieve Synchronisation of KDC and OS Level

(…or other user/group management systems). This is a tricky one, if you don’t want to run into a split brain situation, where one system knows one set of users and another one knows others, which may or may not overlap.

  • Automate user provisioning, e.g., by using an Ansible role that provisions a user in the KDC and on all nodes of the Hadoop cluster.
  • Use services such as SSSD (System Security Services Daemon) that integrates users and groups from user and group management services into the operating system. So you won’t need to actually add them to each node, as long as SSSD is up and running.
  • Manually create OS users on all nodes and in the KDC (don’t do that, obviously ;P )

 

Maybe I’ll expand that list in the future 🙂

3 thoughts on “Basics of Hadoop User Management

    • Thanks for you comment. Matching service users are used for administration purposes. As root is the administrative user of the underlying OS, hdfs is the administrative user of the HDFS service and hive is the administrative user of the HIVE service. These are just the defaults. The administrative user can be (re-)configured for each service.

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  1. Your comments service has filtered the tag angular brackets.
    It should say ‚bracket service bracket user with bracket service bracket, …‘

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